Vliegtuigcrash 1943

Deze pagina zal regelmatig worden bijgewerkt met achtergrondinformatie over de vliegtuigcrash in 1943.


Drone film van de plek waar de Stirling is neergeschoten.
Met dank aan Reclamebureau Graphic.nl
Neef bezoekt graf omgekomen RAF-piloot.
Volledige artikel is te lezen op Leusder Krant..,

26 april 2017 LEUSDEN:
Vliegtuigcrash 1943 Stuart Luker bezocht afgelopen zaterdag, samen met zijn vrouw Wendy, het graf van zijn oom Denis Smith. Deze vond samen met zeven bemanningsleden boven Leusdens grondgebied de dood nadat hun vliegtuig door een Duitse nachtjager was neergeschoten in de vroege avond van 3 februari 1943. Het is 3 februari 1943, 18.27 uur. Vanaf het militaire vliegveld Chedburgh (Suffolk, Oost-Engeland) stijgt de Stirling ..Voor het volledige artikel.

22 april 2017: Werkgroep Stirling geeft laatste brokstukjes terug aan nabestaanden.

Video 22 april 2017:
De overhandiging van de laatste brokstukjes van de Stirling namens de werkgroep vliegtuigcrash Stirling door Wim van de Burgt aan de nabestaanden Stuart en Wendy.


Thank you too for your involvement in researching about the crash of the plane that was flown by my Uncle Denis. It was good to spend the day with you and your friends; I appreciated the opportunity to visit the grave and the site of the crash. Wendy and I enjoyed your company and would also like to thank you for the hospitality you showed to both of us.

We look forward to meeting you again next year.
Stuart en Wendy
22 april 2017: Werkgroep Stirling ontvangt nabestaanden (Stuart en Wendy) van omgekomen piloot Denis H. Smith

Onderstaand een aantal foto's van het bezoek van de nabestaande Stuart en Wendy vastgelegd bij de ontvangt in "Oud Leusden", op "Rusthof", de crashplaats aan de spoordijk, de bomkrater aan de Moosterweg en de lunch bij "Mon Chouette" op zaterdag 22 april 2017.




FILM : THE STIRLING BOMBER

The Stirling was the first four-engined British heavy bomber of the Second World War. Built by Short Brothers, it was to have a relatively short operational career. The Stirling's huge maximum bomb load was only able to be carried for relatively short distances of around 590 miles. On typical missions deep into Germany or Italy a smaller 3,500 lb (1,590 kg) load was carried, consisting of seven 500 lb (227 kg) bombs. Within five months of being introduced, 67 out of the 84 aircraft delivered had been lost to enemy action or written off after crashes.

General characteristics
Crew: 7     Length: 87 ft 3 in (26.6 m)
Wingspan: 99 ft 1 in (30.2 m)     Height: 28 ft 10 in (8.8 m)
Loaded weight: 59,400 lb (26,940 kg)
Performance
Maximum speed: 255 mph (410 km/h) at 21,000 ft (6,400 m)
Range: 2,330 mi (3,750 km)

ARTICLE 1985 Barneveldse Krant: Luchtgevecht boven Leusden
Vliegtuigcrash 1943
ARTICLE 25 februari 2016: Search for fallen pilot
Vliegtuigcrash 1943

MEMORIAL PROJECT: Dutch pensioner hopes to create a monument in honour of men killed in crash



Search for fallen pilot



By Martin Ford- martin.ford@hertsessexnews.co.uk.

A search has been launched to find the family of a pilot who died when his aircraft was shot down during the Second World War. Cheshunt-born Flying Officer Denis Hedley Smith was aged about 25 when his Stirling bomber was brought down by German night fighters over the Netherlands in 1943. More than 70 years on, Albert Schothorst has vivid memories of the night the plane came down close to his childhood home of Leusden, near Utrecht. Today, the crash scene is a picturesque spot beside a brook, woods, footpath and former railway line. Vliegtuigcrash 1943 “The most strong memory I have is the enormous noise when Iwas sitting around the kitchen table with my mother,” he said. “At night, my father and I had already frequently seen the fights in the air and heard the noises.” This time, however, things were different. “The next day I heard the people working at our farm speak about the victims and the salvage,” he said.

Engines
“Some days later my sisters and I were near the railway and there the Germans brought the engines of the plane. “I walked with my sisters at the place of the crash and found traces of the crashed plane.” Mr Schothorst now hopes to erect a monument to the men who lost their lives fighting to free Europe. He said: “When I am at Leusden to see my relatives, I frequently walk there. “When I pass this place, I always think about that crash, and think it is such a pity these men who fought for our freedom should be forgotten. “Therefore, I was pleased that the Historical Association of Leusden took the initiative to erect a monument at the place of the crash.” Since March last year, a group of Dutch historians from the association have collected information about the aircraft’s crash and the RAF crew on board – five Canadians and three British. They have carried out interviews with eyewitnesses and located diaries and written accounts. Flying Officer Smith’s Stirling, part of 214 Squadron, took off from Chedburgh in Suffolk on the evening of February 3, 1943 to take part in a bombing raid on Hamburg. The association believes his aircraft shot down one of the three most dangerous German night fighters of the time before it was in turn brought down, killing all the crew. Flying Officer Smith is buried at a cemetery in Leusden. The next stage was to track down relatives of the air crew in Canada and the UK. Mr Schothorst said: “It started out looking for a needle in a haystack, but the part of the haystack to be searched is getting smaller and there are results. “Relatives have been found for three Canadian airmen. “We have traced the relatives of two British crew members, however we are still looking for the relatives of the very important pilot of the plane.” With help from Christine Hill of the Hertfordshire Family History Society, they have discovered the pilot, Flying Officer Smith, lived with his father, Albert Edward Smith, a grocer, and mother, Gladys Smith, at 35 Hillside Avenue, Cheshunt. He had a brother, Raymond Charles Smith, who died in 1988 and was married to Betsie Lyall and probably had a son, Denis H Smith. They hope residents in the area might help trace family members or descendants of Flying Officer Smith. If you have any information, email martin.ford@hertsessexnews.co.uk

ARTICLE 2 september 2015 : Project moves family
Vliegtuigcrash 1943

MEMORIAL PROJECT: Intelligencer story connects historians with family of Flying Officer John Irven MacKenzie



Project moves family



Luke Hendry-The Intelligencer. It’s been an emotional week for Ann MacKenzie and Jane Perry. Until recently, Flying Officer John Irven MacKenzie was a little- known airman and one of Canada’s more than 45,000 Second World War dead. But now, following an Intelligencer story Aug. 27, Perry and MacKenzie have learned Dutch volunteers are now working to create a memorial to their father and his fallen crew. The sisters are now corresponding with the project’s researchers. Flying Officer MacKenzie, 26, and seven crewmates died Feb. 3, 1943 when a German fighter plane shot down their Royal Air Force Stirling bomber over the Netherlands. The crew, five of whom were Canadian, were en route to Hamburg, Germany on a fire-bombing mission. That last flight is now the focus of the research by members of Historische kring Leusden, the historical society in Leusden, Netherlands. “I find it very moving,” Perry said from her home in London, Ont. “None of his children remember him,” she said.

Vliegtuigcrash 1943

Ann was less than two years old when their father shipped overseas; Jane wasn’t be born until several months after he sailed to England. Their late brother, James, was three. Relatives in the Belleville area alerted the sisters to The Intelligencer’s story. They’re now in touch with researcher Albert Schothorst, who as a six-year-old boy heard the plane crash. The group plans to publish a pamphlet with their findings and create a memorial at the crash site near the town of Leusden. Perry and MacKenzie have sent Schothorst a photo and information about their father, painting a clearer picture of the man. *** John Irven MacKenzie’s initials meant he was known to all as Jim. He was born in Newboro in the Rideau Lakes region northeast of Kingston, the son of John Smith MacKenzie and Ella Elizabeth Lyons. The family settled in Belleville in 1929, Perry said, living on what is now Ritchie Avenue. John Smith MacKenzie later opened a Purina feed franchise in Belleville, she said, and later added a satellite store in Stirling. Young Jim worked for his father before enlisting in the Royal Canadian Air Force in about 1941. Perry said her mother recalled his desire to join the war. Jim and Doris Wallbridge were on a date and began discussing world affairs. “That man Hitler – there’s going to be a war,” Perry quoted her father as saying. When it comes, I’mgoing to go and fight. “That man Hitler’s evil. He’s got to be stopped,” he said, adding a warning. “I might not come back.” And with that, said Perry, he proposed marriage, telling Doris she didn’t have to answer immediately. They married in 1938. Canada declared war on Germany Sept. 10, 1939. One night in 1943, Perry said, her mother awoke suddenly in the middle of the night. “She woke up absolutely devastated and knowing that her best friend was gone,” said Perry. “She knew 10 days before the telegram got there that he was gone. “There was a hole in her life.” Ann MacKenzie said hermother struggled with the loss. She bought a house in Hillier in southern Prince Edward County and in 1946 married Bob Coe, an army officer. The family then moved frequently. Her daughters said Doris spoke little of her first husband unless they asked. “I didn’t hear any details about the crash,” said Ann, who lives in Ottawa. “I don’t know whether that’s because my mother kept them quiet or because she didn’t have them herself.” Perry recalled watching the neighbours’ daily routine: a boy would greet his father when he returned from work; the man would pick him up and carry him into the house. “I can remember asking my mother one day why I didn’t have a daddy doing that. She told me why,” said Perry. “She always said he was her very best friend.” Perry said her mother still talked to her late husband when she faced a difficult decision. “She’s say, ‘OK, Jim, now what do I do?’ “After a while, she said, she’d hear his voice and the answer would come.” Researcher Albert Schothorst wrote in an e-mail to The Intelligencer he feels close to the sisters and could relate to them, saying they are all “victims of this war.”He said their mother’s suffering after the crash brings back his own memories of his anxiety as a boy in a war-torn country and of walking around the crash scene after the bodies and parts of the plane had been removed. “Jim was a volunteer,” he wrote. “It means there were and are men and women who have good ideals and a good mind and will give their lives for that. They will fight against the evil – in this case, against the devilish ideas of Hitler. “The world needs them.” Though neither daughter has visited the airman’s grave, their mother was there in 1988, 20 years before her death. “I think it was kind of closure for her – the final closure,” said Perry. Both she and her sister said they’re happy the Dutch citizens are immortalizing their father’s crew. “I’d like to be able to see what they do,” Ann said. “It’s amazing how much they do just to remember.” luke.hendry@sunmedia.ca

ARTICLE 27 august 2015: Dutch historians seek our help
Vliegtuigcrash 1943


Albert Schothorst still remembers the night the airmen fell from the sky. Now he and his fellow Dutch historians are hoping Belleville residents can help them honour eight men who died in a Second World War plane crash, one of whom was from Belleville. Flying Officer John Irven MacKenzie was a 26-year-old navigator from Belleville when his bomber crashed on the outskirts of the village of Leusden, Netherlands on Feb. 3, 1943. The crash killed all eight crewmen: five Canadians, three British. “The goal is to erect a monument at the place of the crash and to honour the brave men who gave their lives for our freedom!” Schothorst wrote in an e-mail interview. He said volunteers of the Historische kring Leusden – the local historical society – also want to write a brochure detailing the crash, the salvage, the crew’s graves and details of their lives. They’re hoping to include photos of each airman but have yet to find one of MacKenzie. MacKenzie’s crew was among those assigned to a night mission to firebomb Hamburg, Germany. A website dedicated to Mac- Kenzie’s British unit, 214 Squadron of the Royal Air Force, details that final flight. The crew of the Stirling Mark I bomber took off from Chedburgh, Suffolk, England at 6:37 p.m. They were among 10 Stirlings assigned by the Royal Air Force’s 214 Squadron to take part in a major raid on Hamburg, Germany. The bombers carried incendiary bombs. Vliegtuigcrash 1943 The squadron website reports a German night fighter plane shot down MacKenzie’s plane a few kilometres outside of Leusden. It crashed at 8:04 p.m. in the forest. “I was sitting at the table with my mother in the kitchen of our farmhouse,” Schothorst recalled. He was six at the time. “We were sorting beans. “Then there was the tremendous noise and then suddenly quiet. “Probably we were so afraid that we did not go out but stayed inside.” Schothorst said his father was among those who saw the burning wreckage. Schothorst has now interviewed others who saw the plane’s burning wreck and researchers have even found residents’ diary accounts of that night. He said villagers tried to approach the plane but Nazi troops surrounded it. He watched during the next day as as those troops salvaged the engines and other parts. Schothorst said the crash site is now a meadow near a trail that was once a railway near the border of Leusden and neighbouring Woudenberg.

he said leusden was on the front lines of the war in 1940 and again in May 1945, when canadians were among those who liberated the country from the nazis. “germans were in the north; canadians came from the east,” schothorst wrote. “so stories about the wartime and important places (bunkers) still hold interest for the people of leusden.” he said he visited the crew’s graves in a military cemetery – which the dutch call Fields of honour – and but was unable to find further information about the men. schothorst said researchers welcome any information and photos of the crew and hope they’ll still be able to contact surviving relatives. “he was the eldest of the crew and the only one who was married,” he said of MacKenzie. a genealogy website lists MacKenzie’s widow, dor i s (lyons) MacKenzie, as having died in 2008. It adds they had three children: son James Ian MacKenzie, who died in 1990 in his 61st year, and two children which the website notes are not named because they are still alive. While the historians are hoping the public can aid their research, they also want to share their findings. “We realize that i t is late but maybe there are still relatives who would be pleased by more information,” schothorst wrote. sta f f of Veterans affai r s canada referred questions to library and archives canada, staff of which did not respond by press time. royal air Force staff also did not reply by press time. anyone with information about MacKenzie may contact the group via e-mail at secretaris@ historieleusden.nl

Werkgroep vliegtuigcrash in Canadeese krant

Als HKL werkgroep van de vliegtuigcrash 3-2-1943 heeft Ab Schothorst in augustus 2015 contact gelegd met een journalist in Canada. Deze journalist heeft een artikel in de plaatselijke krant geschreven om familieleden van Mackenzie op te sporen. Het artikel is te lezen op dutch-historians-searching

Vliegtuigcrash 1943 Flying Officer John Irven MacKenzie was a 26-year-old navigator from Belleville when his bomber crashed on the outskirts of the village of Leusden, Netherlands on Feb. 3, 1943. The crash killed all eight crewmen: five Canadians, three British.

Albert Schothorst still remembers the night the airmen fell from the sky. Now he and his fellow Dutch historians are hoping Belleville residents can help them honour eight men who died in a Second World War plane crash, one of whom was from Belleville. Flying Officer John Irven MacKenzie was a 26-year-old navigator from Belleville when his bomber crashed on the outskirts of the village of Leusden, Netherlands on Feb. 3, 1943. The crash killed all eight crewmen: five Canadians, three British. “The goal is to erect a monument at the place of the crash and to honour the brave men who gave their lives for our freedom!” Schothorst wrote in an e-mail interview. He said volunteers of the Historische kring Leusden – the local historical society – also want to write a brochure detailing the crash, the salvage, the crew’s graves and details of their lives. They’re hoping to include photos of each airman but have yet to find one of MacKenzie. MacKenzie’s crew was among those assigned to a night mission to firebomb Hamburg, Germany.

Vliegtuigcrash 1943

A website dedicated to MacKenzie’s British unit, 214 Squadron of the Royal Air Force, details that final flight. The crew of the Stirling Mark I bomber took off from Chedburgh, Suffolk, England at 6:37 p.m. They were among 10 Stirlings assigned by the Royal Air Force’s 214 Squadron to take part in a major raid on Hamburg, Germany. The bombers carried incendiary bombs. The squadron website reports a German night fighter plane shot down MacKenzie’s plane a few kilometres outside of Leusden. It crashed at 8:04 p.m. in the forest.

“I was sitting at the table with my mother in the kitchen of our farmhouse,” Schothorst recalled. He was six at the time. “We were sorting beans. “Then there was the tremendous noise and then suddenly quiet. “Probably we were so afraid that we did not go out but stayed inside.” Schothorst said his father was among those who saw the burning wreckage. Schothorst has now interviewed others who saw the plane’s burning wreck and researchers have even found residents’ diary accounts of that night. He said villagers tried to approach the plane but Nazi troops surrounded it. He watched during the next day as as those troops salvaged the engines and other parts. Schothorst said the crash site is now a meadow near a trail that was once a railway near the border of Leusden and neighbouring Woudenberg. He said Leusden was on the front lines of the war in 1940 and again in May 1945, when Canadians were among those who liberated the country from the Nazis. “Germans were in the north; Canadians came from the east,” Schothorst wrote. “So stories about the wartime and important places (bunkers) still hold interest for the people of Leusden. ”He said he visited the crew’s graves in a military cemetery – which the Dutch call Fields of Honour – and but was unable to find further information about the men. Schothorst said researchers welcome any information and photos of the crew and hope they’ll still be able to contact surviving relatives. “He was the eldest of the crew and the only one who was married,” he said of MacKenzie. A genealogy website lists MacKenzie’s widow, Doris (Lyons) MacKenzie, as having died in 2008. It adds they had three children: son James Ian MacKenzie, who died in 1990 in his 61st year, and two children which the website notes are not named because they are still alive. While the historians are hoping the public can aid their research, they also want to share their findings. “We realize that it is late but maybe there are still relatives who would be pleased by more information,” Schothorst wrote. Staff of Veterans Affairs Canada referred questions to Library and Archives Canada, staff of which did not respond by press time. Royal Air Force staff also did not reply by press time. Anyone with information about MacKenzie may contact the group via e-mail at secretaris@historieleusden.nl luke.hendry@sunmedia.ca


werkgroep Vliegtuigcrash



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